An interactive, resource-based workshop for instrumental and vocal music, classroom music and music technology teachers. 

NJMEA Summer Workshop XI
For NJMEA members seeking fresh ideas as the new school year approaches

NJMEA Summer Workshop XI
Tuesday, August 7, 2018
Session Details and Presenter Biographies
Listed by workshop SESSION TIMES

8:00 - 9:10 Sessions

Intro to Modern Band and Popular Music Education
8:00 – 9:10 ROOM 102
Warren Gramm

Close your eyes and imagine the sound of 50 beginning string players. Now open them, use proper “weight, speed, and placement” from the first lesson and be prepared for compliments. 

Warren Gramm is the Manager of Program Outreach for Little Kids Rock. Warren received his Bachelor's in music from TCNJ and his Master's from Peabody Conservatory. He is currently ABD at Boston University. Warren taught modern band, general music, and choir for 12 years in Jersey City prior to joining up with the mission of Little Kids Rock in 2017.


Teaching Jazz Performance in the Non- Jazz Band Setting
8:00 – 9:10 ROOM 104
Dennis Argul

​Dennis Argul is an educator for 33+ years in the NJ Public Schools and is recently retired, taking on this new position in July 2018. Dennis is a freelance bass trombonist, appearing with many ensembles throughout the tri-state area.


Middle School Reading Session
8:00 – 9:10 ROOM 125
Beth Moore

Beth Moore, piano, is a native of Bayville, NJ. She is currently the choir director at Central Regional High School in Bayville. She runs the choir and drama programs in the middle school and high school. Her choirs have performed up and down the east coast at venues such as St John the Divine, The White House, and Carnegie Hall. Alongside choir and drama, she teaches piano lab and adaptive music. Along with her responsibilities at Central, she is a freelance pianist and conductor. She currently accompanies regularly at The Westminster Conservatory in Princeton, The Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association, and Plays in the Park in Edison. She has a Bachelor's Degree in Music Education from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University and a Master's Degree in Piano Accompanying and Coaching from Westminster Choir College. She also has additional studies in piano, conducting, and coaching from Westminster and The Aspen Music Festival. Prior to her appointment at Central, she was on the faculty of The Westminster Conservatory in Princeton.


Reversing Roles: What Students Learn When THEY Teach
8:00 – 9:10 ROOM 126
Larissa Skinner

Developing a deeper understanding of music is essential in order to create high quality music making experiences. Allowing students the opportunity to teach their peers is a powerful way to engage, challenge, and motivate students in your instrumental ensemble.

Larisa Skinner teaches strings at the Passaic Gifted and Talented Academy in Passaic, NJ. She holds a Bachelor's and Master's degree from Montclair State University and a Supervisor’s Certificate from Stockton University. Skinner is passionate about urban music education, traveling, and social justice. Through teaching music, she hopes to provide amazing, life-changing opportunities for her students.


So You Don't Have A Supervisor
8:00 – 9:10 ROOM 218
Tom Maliszewski

Thomas Maliszewski is presently in his thirty-eighth year in education and his twenty-third year as K-12 Supervisor of Fine, Performing and Practical Arts for the Summit Public Schools. He is currently an adjunct professor at William Paterson University teaching a graduate course in Supervision of School Music Programs. He has also been an adjunct professor for Montclair State University, teaching “Marching Band Methods” to the undergraduate music education majors. Tom received his Bachelors Degree in Music Ed. from Glassboro State College (Rowan) and his Masters in Music Education and a second Masters in Administration and Supervision from Montclair State University. He has taught Band (Marching, Concert and Jazz) for over 25 years. Groups under his direction have won 1st place, superior ranking, best music and best sight-reading in various festivals and competitions. He had the honor of performing for President Reagan with the West Orange Marching Band. He was manager for Region II Wind Ensemble and twice served as manager for All State Wind Ensemble. He has served as President for the NJ Music Administrators Association as well as President of CJMEA. He is very proud that Summit Public Schools twice received the award as “Top 100 Music Programs in the Country.



Let's have More Fun in the Classroom
8:00 – 9:10 ROOM 226
Linda Grossman

This session will help you to engage your students in a broad spectrum of multicultural music activities and showcase a broad range of music from different cultures. 

Linda Grossman teaches Preschool through 5th grade general music in Jamesburg, NJ and previously taught K-6 general music in West New York, NJ. She directed an elementary choir in both districts. She is dedicated to finding ways of incorporating music of many different cultures into her weekly lessons with the goal of encouraging students to appreciate and understand diversity in music from a myriad of cultures. Linda holds a BA in Music Education with a vocal concentration from NJCU. 


Music Literacy Games and Activities
8:00 – 9:10 ROOM 222
Dr. Rachel Gibson

Come engage in a variety of rhythmic and melodic practice activities suitable for the elementary music classroom and beyond. Each game fosters musical development in fun and stimulating contexts and addresses several areas of the music curriculum including sight-reading, dictation, composition, and improvisation. Promote music literacy in your classroom with creative and enjoyable activities!


 Dr. Rachel Gibson  is an Associate Professor of Music at Westfield State University in Massachusetts and holds a Ph.D. in Music Education from the University of Washington. She is a specialist in early childhood and elementary music education and has trained in Kodály and Orff approaches. She recently completed a seven-month sabbatical in Guatemala and Nicaragua where she engaged in folk song collection and language study. Prior to her current position, Dr. Gibson taught K-6 general and choral music for 15 years in New York, Connecticut, and Washington State. 

Paras, Parents and Teachers, Oh My!
8:00 - 9:10 ROOM 236
Maureen Butler

The special learners in our classrooms have a team of people that are involved in their lives. Some may be easy to work with, and others may present challenges. This session will discuss ways to make sure we're all on the same page!


Maureen Butler received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Education and Performance at New Jersey City University and her Master of Arts degree in Creative Arts at New York University. She has been teaching music for more than twenty years in the Mountain Lakes District in New Jersey: at the Lake Drive School for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children in Mountain Lakes, where she has designed and implemented a curriculum for students with hearing loss, and at Wildwood Elementary School where she teaches grades K-3 and directs the 5th grade chorus. An NJMEA Board Member, she presents workshops throughout the state and writes about special education topics as they apply to the music classroom for the state journal TEMPO. A former church music director, she currently freelances on organ and piano in northern New Jersey.


​INSTRUMENT REPAIR 
ALL DAY - ROOM 103
Dave Kaplan

Have an instrument in need of some TLC? Want to learn what NOT to do when working on an instrument? Just need some pointers on simple repairs? Dave Kaplan, Music & Arts, will be available ALL DAY. Just stop in and get ready to learn! 



9:20 - 10:30 Sessions

In The Singing Band
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 102
Carol Swinchoski

Carol Swinchoski demonstrates how to use the singing and audiation skills young musicians have acquired in classroom music to sing through their instruments. Focusing first on aural skills, young musicians develop reading skills in a natural and successful way. Video clips of the Old Mill 4th/5th Band will be included to illustrate each concept.


Carol Swinchoski is a classroom and instrumental music teacher at Old Mill Elementary School in Wall Township, NJ. She studied education and trombone performance at the Peabody Conservatory of Music. Carol received her Masters in Music Education with a Kodaly emphasis at Silver Lake College. Using folk songs as a foundation, in the Kodaly tradition, her students develop the singing, audiation and literacy skills necessary for a lifetime of enjoyable music experiences. Her students understand that they express music through singing and instruments are an extension of their voices. Outside of school, Carol plays trombone professionally and maintains a lesson studio of low brass students.


Learning Through Literature: String Reading Session
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 104
Betsy Maliszewski

Come and see how both music specific and common classroom technology can benefit and expand your 4-12 orchestra classroom. Our motto is “It’s not as confusing as it seems”. 

Betsy Maliszewski  is a String Specialist for the West Orange Public Schools in New Jersey. In addition, she teaches string methodology classes for Rutgers University, Caldwell University, New Jersey City University and the UArts Summer Music Program at Villanova. She is the conductor of the Caldwell University String Ensemble, and serves as past president of ASTA/NJ. Betsy has been honored as a Master Teacher by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and the New Philharmonic of NJ. She holds degrees from Rowan University and Montclair University, and is a doctoral student at Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University.


Drum Circle and Motivational Group Activities
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 120
Brian Yatauro

Start the new school year with a bang! This workshop is an interactive experience that will teach you hand percussion, conga and djembe techniques, as well as, traditional African, Brazilian and Cuban rhythms and drumming games that can be used in the general music classroom for all grade levels.
 Hands-On Session. Get ready to have a blast!

Brian A. Yatauro received his Bachelor of Arts in Education and Percussion performance from the College of New Jersey. Following his undergraduate studies he continued his education at the College of New Jersey receiving a Master of Arts in Education. Brian has over 35 years of professional musical experience as a music educator and performer. Having studied with local professionals such as Tony DeNicola (Harry James Band) and Joseph Nero (University of the Arts) he began performing professionally while in college as a drummer and vibraphonist. Performing in his own jazz combo and playing in area big bands he continued working throughout Philadelphia, Atlantic City and the Jersey Shore circuit. After college, he spent a decade teaching in public school education while maintaining a large group of private percussion students and continued to perform with a diverse group of professional players in a variety of music genres including Jazz, Rock, Funk, and Latin.
Brian’s career has brought him to the national music company “Music & Arts Centers” where he works as a School Services District Manager throughout New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania. Most recently Brian has become involved with the Cavalcade of Bands Jazz judging circuit. Known for his versatility as a performer he has been closely involved with New Jersey music educators as an adjudicator and clinician for their jazz ensembles. Over the years Brian has given numerous workshops on percussion repair and clinics in percussion performance. Highly regarded as a drummer and percussionist he continues to perform with a diverse group of musicians ranging from vibraphone duos and horn bands, through to combo and big band jazz.
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Accomodating the Other 80%
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 230
Rick Dammers

This session will focus on the long standing issue of the ‘Other 80%’ of middle and high school students who are not in band, choir, or orchestra, and how technology-based music classes provide one opportunity to expand the reach of music education. The session will include research on the issue and examples of technology-based music classes from around the country.

​Rick Dammers  is the Dean of the College of Performing Arts and Professor of Music Education at Rowan University. Prior to becoming Dean, Rick served as Chair of the Music Department for six years, and led the university-wide tenure and recontracting committee. During his time as chair, the Music Department grew in student enrollment, faculty size, and external funding. He continues to teach courses in technology-based music education, as well as the Exploring Medicine through Musical Composition selective course at Cooper Medical School at Rowan University. In addition to his duties as Dean, his research interests include comprehensive musicianship, and technology in music education and he co-facilitates the NAMM funded TI:ME Music Technology Leadership Academy, a national program for undergraduate and graduate music education students. Before to teaching at Rowan, Rick was a music teacher (band and technology) and the Fine Arts Facilitator in the Ladue School District in suburban St. Louis for 13 years. He serves on the Board of Directors for the College Music Society and serves as a visiting evaluator for the National Association of Schools of Music. 




​​A Band Director’s Guide to Teaching Chorus
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 125
Kahlil Gunther

With shrinking budgets and shifts in assignments, you may find yourself teaching choir for the first time in your career. This session will present practical advice for choral warm-ups, vocal development, sight-singing and techniques for healthy and productive choir rehearsals. Program organization and general planning will also be addressed, including repertoire selection and resources, working with accompanists and concert planning and logistics. 

Kahlil Gunther received his BM from The College of New Jersey and his MA from The University of the Arts. Since 1995, he has served as director of an active choral program at Woodstown High School where curricular responsibilities include Chorus, Concert Choir, Music Theory and Music Technology. In addition, he directs the Chamber Choir, Men’s Ensemble and Women’s Ensemble, advises Tri-M Music Honor Society and serves as musical director for the drama club. He has been a workshop presenter, guest conductor, cooperative teacher and mentor and is active in course and curriculum development. He is an active member of NAfME and ACDA and is the current President of the South Jersey Choral Directors Association. Recognitions include the Te@ch Award, County Teacher of the Year and a Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation grant. Outside of the school setting, he teaches piano and performs regularly as a solo and ensemble pianist.


Five Ways To Engage Hard To Reach Students
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 126
Otto Gross

Explore the intersection of technology and popular music as powerful tools for increasing engagement and retention in upper elementary and middle grade students. Participants will learn strategies for incorporating modern music, songwriting, digital composition, and much more! You’ll walk away ready to meet your students where they are, using the music and devices already in their possession to address age-appropriate concepts and skills while inspiring a connection to music that will last a lifetime.

Otto Gross is a Lead Training Representative and songwriter at QuaverMusic.com and a cum laude graduate of Berklee College of Music with a degree in Music Education. He has taught General Music, Band, Chorus, Jazz Band, Percussion and private lessons across the United States. He has also toured internationally, performing with artists including Bobby McFerrin & The Marsalis Brothers. Otto’s passion is making music with teachers and their students!


Chromebooks, The Cloud and Concerts, Oh My!
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 220
Shawna Longo

​Shawna Longo currently teaches grades 6-8 General Music, directs the Chorus and Drama Club, and serves as a STEAM Facilitator at Hopatcong Middle School in Hopatcong, NJ. She holds a Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; a Master of Public Administration in Arts Administration from Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ; and Supervisor/Curriculum Director’s certification from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ. In addition to teaching, she has also had a successful experience serving as a Music Supervisor for grades K-12. Mrs. Longo has extensive experience designing and implementing music curriculums for grades K-12 in all disciplines (choral, band, and general music). She has presented numerous professional development workshops on a range of topics including curriculum development, music technology, musical theatre, and Music and the Common Core as well as serving on committees for NJMEA and the NJ Chapter of Ti:ME. She was a recipient of the “Governor’s Educator of the Year” Award in 2016 and is listed in Who’s Who Among American Teachers and has also directed and/or choreographed numerous musical theatre productions. Mrs. Longo also serves on the Board of Education for the Morris Plains School District.


Teaching On A Cart
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 226
Jessica Renshaw

So you just found out you're teaching on a cart...now what? This session will offer resources and modifications to teach general music for grades K-8 for teachers that travel from classroom to classroom. Explore what's possible instead of what you feel like you are missing!

Jessica Renshaw is the general music and chorus teacher for grades PreK-8 at Sovereign Avenue School in Atlantic City, NJ. She is an alumna from The College of New Jersey, and has completed graduate work at Rutgers University. She is committed to creating a safe and inclusive classroom environment as well as teaching to the emotional and social needs of her students through music. 


Welcoming Late Arrivers to School Music Through Guitar
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 222
Andrew Pfaff

The oldest members of the K-12 school population are the least involved in school music. How can we better understand these students, give them avenues to applied music, and help them succeed? 
A beginning guitar class in high school is a great opportunity to give “late arrivers” access to music in a school setting which they would otherwise miss. 
Learn how a beginning guitar class can help older students build a personal narrative of success as they enter the post-secondary world. Harness the power of applied music instruction to reinforce social-emotional learning. Your guitar class can be ground zero for “growth mindset” and “grit.”
Come and learn how entrance surveys and pre-test/post-test self-efficacy scales can give you insight into your students’ belief systems and learning orientations, exposing obstacles to a positive school music experience. Learn how to connect with students who consider themselves “non-musical,” and how to generate actionable feedback on your own teaching.


Andrew Pfaff has directed the music program at Bergen County Technical High School in Teterboro, NJ since 2002, and was named his district’s Teacher of the Year in 2014. He holds an M.Ed. in Educational Leadership from The College of New Jersey. In 2017, Andrew presented his research at the 2017 Association for Popular Music Education conference and the 2017 NAfME National In-Service conference. He was also one of four presenters in a roundtable session entitled “Generating Knowledge From Teacher Research to Meet the Challenges Within Public Education” held at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association.

A magna cum laude graduate of Temple University in jazz bass performance, Andrew also maintains a busy playing career in the greater NYC metropolitan area. His bass work is featured on recordings by Karen Lloyd, Robin Haffley, MJ12 and others. In 2012 Andrew produced, engineered and played on the album P’ticha by vocalist/cantor Meredith Greenberg. Andrew’s own album, under the performing name Draff, was released in Fall 2015.


Differentiating and Modifying Assessments for Special Learners
9:20 – 10:30 ROOM 236
Lucia Marone

Lucia Marone is a Music Educator/Therapist in Vineland, NJ who works with regular ed, special ed, and ELL learners. She has been teaching for over 25 years and truly believes in hands-on learning.



10:40 - 11:50 Sessions

Zero to Jazz: Teaching Improvisation in Jazz Band Rehearsal
10:40 – 11:50 ROOM 102
Richard Grennor
With keen insight into teaching improvisation to middle schoolers, Dr. Grennor will share innovative strategies and materials that will help music educators overcome the common challenges of getting their students to improvise confidently and melodically. The workshop will provide techniques for incorporating jazz improvisation as a regular part of every jazz band rehearsal. The session will equip the music educator with new ideas and free materials that will help your students solo like a pro! Participants are encouraged to bring their instrument. 

Richard Grennor, Ed.D. has been teaching instrumental music in New Jersey to students of all ages and grade levels for 17 years. He holds a B.A. degree in Music Education from Kean University, and a M.A. in Educational Leadership from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Richard earned his Ed.D. degree from Nova Southeastern Universities -National Program for Educational Leaders.
Dr. Grennor has a record of accomplishment in education and the ability to get the very best out of his pupils. Performance ensembles under his direction have consistently received first place trophies, superior or excellent ratings at the Festivals of Music Competitions. His students have been recognized for their improvised solos in the following categories: best drum set soloists, best saxophone soloists, best piano soloist, best bass soloist and best flute soloist. Dr. Grennor has conducted the Central Jersey Music Educators Association Elementary Honors band and is a well sought after private saxophone instructor.
Dr. Grennor has presented professional development workshops for the New Jersey Music Educators Association Summer Conference IX and research for the 55th Annual National Association for Music Education Biennial In-Service Conference. He is a certified by the National Judges Association as an Individual Music Analysis Judge and regularly adjudicates high school music competitions. Dr. Grennor served as the woodwind specialist judge for the 2017 Tournament of Bands Atlantic Coast Championships held at Hersheypark Stadium, PA.



Performance Literature: Elementary & Middle School Band Reading Session
10:40 – 11:50 ROOM 120
Barb Santoro

 Bring your instrument to this reading session where we will play through and discuss some of the new titles provided by J.W. Pepper. Feel free to come as an audience member if you can’t bring an instrument.

Barbara Santoro is an active freelance musician, performing with the Edison Symphony, Monmouth Symphony, Orchestra of St. Peter by the Sea, Garden State Philharmonic, Central Jersey Wind Ensemble, Toms River Municipal Band, American Repertory Ballet Orchestra, Boheme Opera and Edison's Plays in the Park. She has performed with Ella Fitzgerald, Robert Merrill, Jack Jones, Anne Murray, Lee Ann Rimes and Ronan Tynan, and Bobby Rydell. As an adjusicator, she has judged concerto and scholarship competitions for the Westminster Conservatory, High Note Music Festivals and Festivals sponsored by the New Jersey Music Educators Association.

Mrs. Santoro has taught both instrumental and general/vocal music at every level, Pre-K through 12. Additionally, she maintains an active private studio, teaching clarinet and saxophone. As a member of The National Association for Music Education (NAfME), Mrs. Santoro has presented workshops at the NJ Music Educators State Conference, NJEA Convention, New Hampshire Music Educators State Conference, Music Educators National Conference Eastern Division (2004) and National Conference (2006) and the NJMEA Summer Workshop. She has also served on the Central Jersey Music Educators Board of Directors as K-8 Band Division Chair, K-8 Orchestra Division Chair, recording secretary and corresponding secretary. Also, Mrs. Santoro served as a music specialist on the team responsible for creating the New Jersey Model Curriculum Assessments for the Visual and Performing Arts.
Mrs. Santoro has also been a guest speaker to undergraduate music students at The College of New Jersey, Mason Gross School of the Arts, Carnegie Mellon and Ithaca College as well as supervising student teachers for Rutgers University. She has conducted honors groups for the Central Jersey Music Educators Association; guest conducted the Central Jersey Wind Ensemble, the Imperial Band of South River, the Toms River Municipal Band and is the conductor of the George Krauss Memorial Concert Band. Mrs. Santoro also conducts the Monmouth Symphony in its school performances.

Mrs. Santoro received her BS and M.Ed from Trenton State College (now The College of New Jersey) along with her Supervisor and Principal certificates.


Arts Integration & STEAM
10:40 - 11:50 ROOM 230
Shawna Longo & Kurt Zimmerman

Shawna Longo currently teaches grades 6-8 General Music, directs the Chorus and Drama Club, and serves as a STEAM Facilitator at Hopatcong Middle School in Hopatcong, NJ. She holds a Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC; a Master of Public Administration in Arts Administration from Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ; and Supervisor/Curriculum Director’s certification from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ. In addition to teaching, she has also had a successful experience serving as a Music Supervisor for grades K-12. Mrs. Longo has extensive experience designing and implementing music curriculums for grades K-12 in all disciplines (choral, band, and general music). She has presented numerous professional development workshops on a range of topics including curriculum development, music technology, musical theatre, and Music and the Common Core as well as serving on committees for NJMEA and the NJ Chapter of Ti:ME. She was a recipient of the “Governor’s Educator of the Year” Award in 2016 and is listed in Who’s Who Among American Teachers and has also directed and/or choreographed numerous musical theatre productions. Mrs. Longo also serves on the Board of Education for the Morris Plains School District.


A graduate of William Paterson College, Kurt Zimmerman has a Bachelor of Music Degree in Music Education. Kurt works in the Hopatcong Borough Schools in Sussex County where he teaches band in both the high school and middle school. He also directs the marching band, pep band, holiday ensemble and pit orchestra in the high school.

Mr. Zimmermann has previously taught in Rockaway Township and in the Westwood Regional School District. During that time, Kurt has taught band, strings, general music and chorus, and he served as the District Chairperson for the Fine and Performing Arts Department in the Rockaway Township Public Schools. He is listed in the Who's Who Among American Teachers. 

Kurt is the Associate Music Director and Co-Principal Trumpet of the Hanover Wind Symphony. He is an active performer in local churches and various cover bands. He has conducted the 2007 New Jersey Region 1 Honors Intermediate Band and the 2014 the New Jersey Region 1 Elementary Honors Band, is a local private instrumental music instructor, and has served as the pit orchestra director or lead trumpet player in many local musical theatre productions.

High School Reading Session
10:20 - 11:30 ROOM 125
Kahlil Gunther

Kahlil Gunther received his BM from The College of New Jersey and his MA from The University of the Arts. Since 1995, he has served as director of an active choral program at Woodstown High School where curricular responsibilities include Chorus, Concert Choir, Music Theory and Music Technology. In addition, he directs the Chamber Choir, Men’s Ensemble and Women’s Ensemble, advises Tri-M Music Honor Society and serves as musical director for the drama club. He has been a workshop presenter, guest conductor, cooperative teacher and mentor and is active in course and curriculum development. He is an active member of NAfME and ACDA and is the current President of the South Jersey Choral Directors Association. Recognitions include the Te@ch Award, County Teacher of the Year and a Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation grant. Outside of the school setting, he teaches piano and performs regularly as a solo and ensemble pianist.


Danielson Toolbox for Music Educators
10:20 - 11:30 ROOM 126
Larisa Skinner

Have you ever struggled with the applicability of the Danielson Framework for Teaching as a music educator? We have created a toolbox of ideas and real life classroom situations where the Danielson Framework can be effectively utilized and strengthen our teaching strategies as it applies to the music classroom. 

Larisa Skinner teaches strings at the Passaic Gifted and Talented Academy in Passaic, NJ. She holds a Bachelor's and Master's degree from Montclair State University and a Supervisor’s Certificate from Stockton University. Skinner is passionate about urban music education, traveling, and social justice. Through teaching music, she hopes to provide amazing, life-changing opportunities for her students.


Dealing With Administration - Staff - Parents: They’re All People!
10:40 – 11:50 ROOM 218
Nick Santoro

Nicholas Santoro retired after 37 years as a public school music educator and arts administrator. He served as an instrumental music teacher at Freehold Twp. HS, North Brunswick Twp. HS and Bridgewater-Raritan HS East before entering administration. He served as Program Administrator for the New Jersey School of the Arts, Department Chairperson for performing Arts at Arts HS in Newark, Supervisor of Arts Education for the East Brunswick Schools and Supervisor of Fine Arts for the South Orange Maplewood Schools. He served as the Music Specialist on the committee which wrote the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards and presently served on the committee which is creating the Model Curriculum for the arts for the NJ Department of Education.

Mr. Santoro has presented In-Service workshops at conferences for NJEA, NJMEA, and for MENC (NAfME) Eastern Division and National conferences.

Mr. Santoro is active as a performer and conductor, serving as Music Director and Conductor of the Rutgers University Alumni Wind Symphony and the Central Jersey Wind Ensemble.



The Spectrum of Multicultural Music
10:40 – 11:50 ROOM 103
Linda Grossman

This session will help you to engage your students in a broad spectrum of multicultural music activities and showcase a broad range of music from different cultures. 

Linda Grossman teaches Preschool through 5th grade general music in Jamesburg, NJ and previously taught K-6 general music in West New York, NJ. She directed an elementary choir in both districts. She is dedicated to finding ways of incorporating music of many different cultures into her weekly lessons with the goal of encouraging students to appreciate and understand diversity in music from a myriad of cultures. Linda holds a BA in Music Education with a vocal concentration from NJCU. 


Rounds To Sing - Rounds To Play
10:40 – 11:50 ROOM 222
Ardith Collins

Rounds and canons are wonderful for students of all ages and are joyful to experience in all types of musical settings. Participants will sing melodies suitable for all ages and ensembles, including those from Sol Weber's book "Rounds Galore", as well as his lesser-known "Unofficial Rounds" publication. Participants are invited to bring their own rounds to share. Rounds Galore materials will be available for purchase. Participants will learn great rounds for students of all ages, voices, and instruments!

Ardith Collins teaches grades 5 - 7 General Music and String Ensemble in Manhattan. Ardith has completed Orff Schulwerk and Kodály Levels, and is an avid folk dancer and rounds enthusiast.
Rounds To Sing, Rounds to Play will explore the joy of rounds for all musicians. Teachers of all music areas: instrumental, general, and choral are welcome to attend!


Making Musical and Peer Connections: Including Special Learners in Ensembles
10:40 – 11:50 ROOM 236
Glennis Patterson

Glennis Patterson has taught music in New Jersey public schools for eighteen years. She is currently an elementary music teacher at Katharine D. Malone School in Rockaway, NJ, where she teaches grades K-5 general music, fifth grade chorus, and beginning band. She earned her Bachelor of Music in music education at Susquehanna University and Kodaly certification at New York University. She is certified as a teacher of students with disabilities and is currently studying to earn a master's degree in special education. Glennis lives in Randolph, NJ with her husband and two daughters.


1:10 - 2:20 Sessions

Effective Strategies for Correcting Bad Habits in Upper Strings
1:10 – 2:20 ROOM 102
Sergei Panov

Sergei Panov has a B.M. from Temple University in Violin Performance, under the tutelage of Helen Kwalwasser. 12 years of experience in private violin and viola lessons, has led Sergei to develop effective strategies for teaching upper strings. This is Sergei’s third year teaching at Rahway Middle School (Academy) and High School as the Orchestra Director.​



FUNCTION CHORALES: The Ultimate in Musical Engagement
1:10 – 2:20 ROOM 104
Keith Hodson

Tired of “mindless” warm-ups? Engage your students with horizontal and vertical listening skills, fluency in all keys, understanding the “function” and tendencies of the notes they are playing. Learn to compose your own function chorales and teach your students to compose as well! We need SATB voices... so bring your instrument!

Keith W. Hodgson is the Director of Music Education at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA. He is the Eastern Division President-Elect of the National Association for Music Education. Mr. Hodgson is a Past-President of the New Jersey Music Educator's Association, a National Board Certified Teacher, the recipient of the 2014 New Jersey Governor's Award in the Arts for Leadership in Music and was a Grammy Nominated Music Educator Quarter Finalist in 2014.

Mr. Hodgson was a high school band director and music teacher for twenty-six years in New Jersey, the majority as Director of Instrumental Music at Mainland Regional HS in Linwood, NJ. Mr. Hodgson was honored as the recipient of the 2016 Distinguished Service Award by the New Jersey Music Educators Association.

Mr. Hodgson is the Conductor and Music Director for the South Jersey Area Wind Ensemble, the Head Director of the American Music Abroad Gold Tour to Europe, and a music adjunct at Stockton University. Keith Hodgson is an active guest conductor, a band clinician and guest speaker and presenter.



Beginning Sound Production for Brass
1:10 – 2:20 Room 120
Nick Santoro


Nicholas Santoro retired after 37 years as a public school music educator and arts administrator. He served as an instrumental music teacher at Freehold Twp. HS, North Brunswick Twp. HS and Bridgewater-Raritan HS East before entering administration. He served as Program Administrator for the New Jersey School of the Arts, Department Chairperson for performing Arts at Arts HS in Newark, Supervisor of Arts Education for the East Brunswick Schools and Supervisor of Fine Arts for the South Orange Maplewood Schools. He served as the Music Specialist on the committee which wrote the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards and presently served on the committee which is creating the Model Curriculum for the arts for the NJ Department of Education.

Mr. Santoro has presented In-Service workshops at conferences for NJEA, NJMEA, and for MENC (NAfME) Eastern Division and National conferences.

Mr. Santoro is active as a performer and conductor, serving as Music Director and Conductor of the Rutgers University Alumni Wind Symphony and the Central Jersey Wind Ensemble.



Preschool Prodigies in the Elementary Urban Classroom
1:10 – 2:20 ROOM 230
Brandon Frumolt

Brandon Frumolt is a general music educator from Elizabeth, NJ. His experience in the classroom has revolved around the early childhood and elementary music classes in an urban environment. The unique challenges presented by this have allowed him to focus on resources and techniques which have proven successful in overcoming language barriers, large group instruction, etc. He has also partnered with the Institute of Music for Children in Elizabeth in creating an urban farming program and elementary music classes. This is his first time he will be presenting for the NJMEA and is excited to be here.


Using student voice when choosing choral repertoire: Techniques and Benefits
1:10 – 2:20 ROOM 125
Holly Williams

Holly Williams has been a choral director to grades 2-8 in an urban district for over 10 years. She received her bachelor’s degree in music education from Mason Gross School of the Arts and her master’s degree from Boston University, also In music education. Her passion for singing has allowed her to perform at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and the Sydney Opera House, to name a few. It also has helped her travel the world to Asia, Europe and Australia as a former member of the New Jersey Choral Society. Her passion is not limited to choral singing as she also musically directs and performs in musical theater productions. She credits her success to her family and wonderful teachers that have fostered her talent and love of music. She has loved contributing to her students’ education and fostering their passion and talents for the past decade and looks forward to many more


An Intro To Ukulele
1:10 – 2:20 ROOM 126
Brian Hunter

Brian Hunter teaches Elementary General Music and Band in South Brunswick, New Jersey. He holds a Bachelor of Music degree from The College of New Jersey, a Masters of Music in Music Education degree from Rutgers University, and is currently pursuing his Doctorate in Music Education at Rutgers University. His research interests include creativity and improvisation in the elementary general music classroom. Prior to teaching music Brian was a Sergeant and euphonium player in the United States Marine Corps. Brian completed his Orff Certification at Villanova University/University of the Arts. He is the treasurer of the Northern New Jersey Orff Schulwerk Association, and an active member of the Philadelphia Area Orff Schulwerk Association, AOSA, NJMEA, and NAfME and formerly served on the board for The American Center for Elemental Music and Movement (ACEMM).


Understanding Danielson
1:10 – 2:20 ROOM 218
Jeff Santoro

Jeff Santoro is the Supervisor of Fine and Performing Arts for the West Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School District. Mr. Santoro has experience writing curriculum, leading professional development sessions and presenting sessions about using the Danielson Framework for teacher evaluations. He has also been a guest speaker in music and art education classes at Rutgers University and the College of New Jersey. Mr. Santoro served as the leader of the music writing team for the revision of the New Jersey Student Learning Standards for Visual and Performing Arts. Prior to this position, Mr. Santoro taught for 12 years, including 6 as the Band Director at Allentown High School (NJ). While at Allentown, Mr. Santoro played a role in the creation of an Arts Academy through New Jersey’s Interdistrict School Choice Program.

Mr. Santoro has also been active around the State in organizations such as North Jersey Area Band, The All Shore Band Director’s Association and is currently the Past President of the Central Jersey Music Educators Association and President Elect of the New Jersey Music Educators Association . Mr. Santoro has a B.M. and M.M. in Music Education, as well as Supervisor Certification from Rutgers University.


Mindfulness & Movement in the General Music Classroom
1:10 – 2:20 ROOM 226
Jessica Renshaw

We all know that movement is part of the general music classroom, but today we will explore how movement and breath work can be used in all grades and content areas. Mindfulness and movement (aka yoga) helps students manage their behavior, get focused and connect with music. Come discover techniques to bring back to your classroom and implement immediately! Please dress comfortably for movement.

Jessica Renshaw is the PreK-8 general music and chorus teacher at Sovereign Avenue School in Atlantic City, NJ. She is an alumna from The College of New Jersey and has completed graduate work at Rutgers University. She is a 200-hour certified yoga teacher and regular implements mindfulness and movement into her classroom.


Living Traditions: Children’s Songs and Singing Games from Central America
1:10 - 2:20 ROOM 222
Dr. Rachel Gibson

¡Bienvenidos - Welcome! Come engage in songs and singing games that were learned from children and teachers from several communities in Guatemala and Nicaragua. Field videos will be shown to demonstrate these living traditions in authentic contexts.

Dr. Rachel Gibson is an Associate Professor of Music at Westfield State University in Massachusetts and holds a Ph.D. in Music Education from the University of Washington. She is a specialist in early childhood and elementary music education and has trained in Kodály and Orff approaches. She recently completed a seven-month sabbatical in Guatemala and Nicaragua where she engaged in folk song collection and language study. Prior to her current position, Dr. Gibson taught K-6 general and choral music for 15 years in New York, Connecticut, and Washington State. 


Engaging All Learners: Tools and Techniques to Reach Different Types of Learners in the Music Classroom
1:10 – 2:20 ROOM 236
Brian Wagner

Come see how activities and skills in the elementary and secondary general music classroom can easily be adapted and differentiated to reach a wide range of learners, specifically focusing on special learners. You will see how: music literacy, active listening, and composition can be adapted. Such techniques include: adaptive music literacy, color coding, incorporating multimodal teaching, and using manipulatives. You will leave with a handout, and a variety of resources/activities that can be incorporated into your own classroom. 

Brian J. Wagner-Yeung received his BA and MSED in Music Education from CUNY Queens College. He is currently split between two schools in Brooklyn: PS 370K and Brooklyn School of Inquiry. He has worked with students on the elementary, middle school, and high school level, where he has worked with students who have severe special needs - in addition to students who are gifted and talented. Mr. Wagner has taught: general music, string orchestra, musical theatre, and performing arts. He is a classically trained cellist, and currently plays regularly in the NYC area. He is the special learners and membership board member of Music Educators Association of NYC (MEANYC).

He has presented, and co-presented workshops for: NYSSMA, NYCDOE, SCMEA, OMEA, NJMEA, CMEA, PMEA, NYSCAME, NAfME National In-Service Conference, NAfME Biennial Eastern Division Conference, NAfME Western Division Conference, and two online webinars for NAfME. He has also presented lectures at CUNY Brooklyn College, CUNY Queens College, and NYU. In addition, he has had papers and articles published in: International Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, School Music News, Tempo, Maryland Music Educator, Bluegrass Music News, and Windsong Journal - in addition to two articles for NAfME’s Music in a Minuet. 



2:30 - 3:40 Sessions



Google Classroom and Strings
2:30 – 3:40 ROOM 102
Melissa Clark

Using google classroom to engage your string players inside and outside the classroom. Bring your laptop to the session to set up your google classroom before the school year starts up. We will go over all the in's and out's of the program.


Melissa Clark graduated from The College of NJ with a Bachelors of Music Education degree viola concentration. She has been teaching in Lawrence Township Public Schools since 2005. In 2015-2016 school year, Melissa was named teacher of the year at Lawrence Middle School which is part of the Governor's Educator program for the state of NJ. She is an active member of New Jersey Music Educators Association (NJMEA) and Central Jersey Music Educators Association (CJMEA). She presented twice at the NAfME National In-service in Grapevine, TX. During her free time, she enjoys spending time with her husband Chris and their two children Hayden and Aimee. 


Instrumental Music Portfolios: A Benchmark Assessment
2:30 – 3:40 Room 102
Keith Hodgson


How do you individualize assessment, track student progress and assist students in sequentially knowing what to practice? This session will look at designing individual student portfolios, the ultimate teaching tool for implementing your curriculum through differentiated instruction and assessment. Examples will be presented for elementary, middle and high school curriculums.

Keith W. Hodgson is the Director of Music Education at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA. He is the Eastern Division President-Elect of the National Association for Music Education. Mr. Hodgson is a Past-President of the New Jersey Music Educator's Association, a National Board Certified Teacher, the recipient of the 2014 New Jersey Governor's Award in the Arts for Leadership in Music and was a Grammy Nominated Music Educator Quarter Finalist in 2014.

Mr. Hodgson was a high school band director and music teacher for twenty-six years in New Jersey, the majority as Director of Instrumental Music at Mainland Regional HS in Linwood, NJ. Mr. Hodgson was honored as the recipient of the 2016 Distinguished Service Award by the New Jersey Music Educators Association.

Mr. Hodgson is the Conductor and Music Director for the South Jersey Area Wind Ensemble, the Head Director of the American Music Abroad Gold Tour to Europe, and a music adjunct at Stockton University. Keith Hodgson is an active guest conductor, a band clinician and guest speaker and presenter.


Beginning Techniques for Percussion
2:30 – 3:40 ROOM 120
Brian Yatauro

Brian Yatauro received his Bachelor of Arts in Education and Percussion performance from the College of New Jersey. Following his undergraduate studies he continued his education at the College of New Jersey receiving a Master of Arts in Education. Brian has over 35 years of professional musical experience as a music educator and performer. Having studied with local professionals such as Tony DeNicola (Harry James Band) and Joseph Nero (University of the Arts) he began performing professionally while in college as a drummer and vibraphonist. Performing in his own jazz combo and playing in area big bands he continued working throughout Philadelphia, Atlantic City and the Jersey Shore circuit. After college, he spent a decade teaching in public school education while maintaining a large group of private percussion students and continued to perform with a diverse group of professional players in a variety of music genres including Jazz, Rock, Funk, and Latin.
 Brian’s career has brought him to the national music company “Music & Arts Centers” where he works as a School Services District Manager throughout New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania. Most recently Brian has become involved with the Cavalcade of Bands Jazz judging circuit. Known for his versatility as a performer he has been closely involved with New Jersey music educators as an adjudicator and clinician for their jazz ensembles. Over the years Brian has given numerous workshops on percussion repair and clinics in percussion performance. Highly regarded as a drummer and percussionist when time allows he continues to perform with a diverse group of musicians ranging from vibraphone duos and horn bands, through to combo and big band jazz.


Urban Music Teaching: Beyond The Perceived Barriers
2:30 – 3:40 ROOM 230
September Daniels

Urban Music Teaching: Beyond the Perceived Barriers will focus on a conceptual understanding of music teaching and learning based on a perspective of culturally responsive teaching, social justice and equitable access for all students, using students strengths as a primary resource.

September Daniels teaches Gen./Choral/Vocal music in a PreK - 8 learning environment at Toussaint-L'Ouverture Marquis de Lafayette School No. 6 in Elizabeth, NJ where she conducts choral ensembles for grades 5-8, small vocal ensemble, and vocal studio students. She has earned Bachelors' degrees in both Music Education and Music Business from Winston-Salem State University, a Master of Arts in Music Education from Columbia University, and has an Ed. S degree in Educational Leadership Policy and Management from Seton Hall University where she is currently a Doctoral Candidate.
September Daniels is passionate about public school education and devoted to the belief in equity and excellence for ALL students. 



Building Quality Time for Music Literacy During Rehearsal
2:20 – 3:40 ROOM 125
Craig Knapp


One of the challenges that elementary choral directors often face is building in quality time for music literacy during rehearsals. Rehearsal time is limited and we often find ourselves focusing on the preparation and demands of upcoming performances and concerts. This workshop will guide participants through a sequential series of activities, warm-ups, techniques, visuals and strategies, all implementing Conversational Solfege. Attendees will also be guided through various games including, "Forbidden Pattern," "The Missing Link," "Human Piano," "Rapid Fire," "Simon," "Lower the Curtain," and "Solfege Wars." These carefully sequenced and fun games help to create a positive choral rehearsal climate that will enable students to joyfully assimilate the skills and content necessary to be musically literate. This approach will foster musical independence, guarantee joyful music making, establish a successful musically literate elementary choir and will facilitate a confident environment for your students to learn and grow. Choral packets will be provided for workshop attendees. 

Craig B. Knapp is a graduate of the Crane School of Music and has been teaching Classroom Music and Chorus, grades 3 through 5, in the Rocky Point School District since 1998. With his innovative and energetic approach to music education, Mr. Knapp directs the Metropolitan Youth Orchestra of New York’s Children’s Treble Choirs. Craig is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Hofstra University. He is also the director of the Early Childhood Community Music Program at Stony Brook University, where he instructs children in Pre-K through 3rd grade. Craig is the co-author of the book, “First Steps in Music with Orff Schulwerk: Sing, Say, Dance, Play.”

Craig is a sought-after clinician and choral conductor and has guest conducted for the Connecticut Music Educators’ Association Elementary Honors Choir, KONY (Kodály Organization of New York) “Voices United” Festival, Pennsylvania Music Educators' Association Elementary ChorusFest and various All-County chorus groups throughout New York. Craig has presented elementary classroom music and choral workshops at various music education conferences, including national conferences for NAfME, ACDA, OAKE and FAME.
Craig is the Program Coordinator for the Orff-Schulwerk Summer Studies at Hofstra University and holds Lifetime Memberships in ACDA, FAME and OAKE.



Practice Smarter, Not Harder
2:20 – 3:40 ROOM 126
John Pursell

Designed to help musicians make more efficient use of practice time by using the body in a more physiologically correct way and the brain in a more neurologically correct way. Three ideas about practice are discussed: 1) using athletically based training ideas for embouchure development, 2) understanding how the brain works and learns, and 3) applying the principles of "random practice." These ideas are then combined into a C.T.R: Comprehensive Training Routine that is applicable to all instruments.

Dr. John Pursell has been referred to as "the best of the brass" and "a brilliant trumpeter" in the print media. He is retired from his position as the Senior Ceremonial Trumpeter with the United States Air Force Band in Washington, DC. Today he performs as a Yamaha Trumpet Artist & Clinician at high schools, colleges and music educator conferences throughout the United States. His performances and presentations have taken him to 44 states, 7 foreign countries and over two dozen educator conferences as well as three times at the NJMEA Conference. He holds a DMA from the University of Maryland, BM and MM from West Chester State College and is a published author, with over 25 articles in print. 


Exploring Music Therapary As A Career Option
2:30 – 3:40 ROOM 2218
Maire Fosket
Have you ever wondered how music could have a therapeutic effect on a person? Because, in fact, there are many ways we can impact the special learners in our classrooms. This session will provide a brief introduction to the field of music therapy and how music therapy (or thinking like a music therapist) can affect change.

Ms. Fosket is employed as a K-5 Vocal/General Music teacher with over 20 years of experience working with children with special needs. She earned her Master's degree in Music Education from Westminster Choir College and her Bachelor's degree in Music Therapy from Montclair State University. She previously held a position at WCC as an adjunct instructor bringing her experiences as a music therapist to the college classroom.  


Easy Steps to Improvisation: A Child-centered, Orff-Inspired Approach
2:30 – 3:40 ROOM 226
Brian Hunter

This sequential Orff-inspired approach to improvisation teaches students to improvise in a safe environment while building their musical skills through their own musical creations. Improvisation activities include movement/body percussion, vocal, rhythmic, and melodic improvisations. 

Brian Hunter teaches Elementary General Music and Band in South Brunswick, New Jersey. He holds a Bachelor of Music degree from The College of New Jersey, a Masters of Music in Music Education degree from Rutgers University, and is currently pursuing his Doctorate in Music Education at Rutgers University. His research interests include creativity and improvisation in the elementary general music classroom. Prior to teaching music Brian was a Sergeant and euphonium player in the United States Marine Corps. Brian completed his Orff Certification at Villanova University/University of the Arts. He is the treasurer of the Northern New Jersey Orff Schulwerk Association, and an active member of the Philadelphia Area Orff Schulwerk Association, AOSA, NJMEA, and NAfME and formerly served on the board for The American Center for Elemental Music and Movement (ACEMM).


Organized Chaos: Centers in the Elementary General Music Classroom
2:30 – 3:40 ROOM 222
Sara Dreher

 Tips and tricks for organizing and implementing hands-on learning centers for grades 3-5. Specific center examples will focus respectively on Recorder Karate and the science of sound for upper elementary. Please bring a recorder! 

Sara Dreher graduated Magna Cum Laude from The College of New Jersey in 2014 with a Bachelor of Music in Music Education. She currently teaches K-6 general/vocal music in Little Egg Harbor Township. Sara has completed levels I & II of Orff-Schulwerk certification and will complete her final level this summer. She is an active bassoon with the South Jersey Area Wind Ensemble and enjoys teaching private lessons in the South Jersey area. 


Movement Activities for Special Learners
2:30 – 3:40 ROOM 236
Glennis Patterson

Glennis E. Patterson has been teaching music in New Jersey public schools for 18 years. She is an elementary music teacher at Katharine D. Malone School in Rockaway Township, New Jersey where she teaches general music, chorus, and band. She earned her Bachelor of Music in Music Education at Susquehanna University and Kodaly certification at New York University. She is currently studying to earn a master's degree in special education at Centenary University.


3:50 - 5:00 Sessions

Asking Better Questions: A String Teacher’s Exploration of Bloom’s and Danielson 3
3:50 – 5:00 Room 102
Larisa Skinner

In this session we will explore ways to incorporate higher level thinking, better engagement, and deeper understanding in the ensemble classroom.  

​Larisa Skinner teaches strings at the Passaic Gifted and Talented Academy in Passaic, NJ. She holds a Bachelor's and Master's degree from Montclair State University and a Supervisor’s Certificate from Stockton University. Skinner is passionate about urban music education, traveling, and social justice. Through teaching music, she hopes to provide amazing, life-changing opportunities for her students.


Beginning Technique for Strings
3:50 – 5:00 ROOM 104
Betsy Maliszewski

Teaching beginners is not for the faint of heart. The concept of a good tone is the foundation for everything that comes after. Techniques for good tone from the very beginning will be discussed and applied through audience participation. Bring an instrument or choose one that will be provided at the session.

Betsy Maliszewski  is a String Specialist for the West Orange Public Schools in New Jersey. In addition, she teaches string methodology classes for Rutgers University, Caldwell University, New Jersey City University and the UArts Summer Music Program at Villanova. She is the conductor of the Caldwell University String Ensemble, and serves as past president of ASTA/NJ. Betsy has been honored as a Master Teacher by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and the New Philharmonic of NJ. She holds degrees from Rowan University and Montclair University, and is a doctoral student at Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University.


Beginning Sound Production for Woodwinds
3:50 – 5:00 ROOM 120
Barb Santoro

Teaching beginners is not for the faint of heart. The concept of a good tone is the foundation for everything that comes after. Techniques for good tone from the very beginning will be discussed and applied through audience participation. Bring an instrument or choose one that will be provided at the session.

Barbara Santoro is an active freelance musician, performing with various symphonies, opera companies, theater companies and concert bands.
Mrs. Santoro has judged concerto and scholarship competitions for the Westminster Conservatory, the Monmouth Symphony Orchestra and is currently an adjudicator for High Note Music Festivals and Festivals sponsored by the New Jersey Music Educators Association.

Mrs. Santoro has taught both instrumental and general/vocal music at every level, Pre-K through 12. Additionally, she maintains an active private studio, teaching clarinet and saxophone. As a member of The National Association for Music Education (NAfME), Mrs. Santoro has presented workshops at the State, Regional and National levels. She has also served on the Central Jersey Music Educators Board of Directors as K-8 Band Division Chair, K-8 Orchestra Division Chair, recording secretary and corresponding secretary. Additionally, Mrs. Santoro served as a music specialist on the team responsible for creating the New Jersey Model Curriculum Assessments for the Visual and Performing Arts and is on the team that developed the new music scoring guide and criteria for the County and State Teen Arts Festivals.

Mrs. Santoro has also been a guest speaker to undergraduate music students at The College of New Jersey, Mason Gross School of the Arts, Carnegie Mellon and Ithaca College as well as supervising student teachers for Rutgers University. She has conducted honors groups for the Central Jersey Music Educators Association; guest conducted the Central Jersey Wind Ensemble, the Imperial Band of South River, the Toms River Municipal Band, Monmouth Symphony and is the conductor of the George Krauss Memorial Concert Band and Assistant conductor of the Monmouth Symphony.


Tools and Resources for the Urban Music Educator
3:50 – 5:00 ROOM 230
Dennis Argul

Dennis Argul has been a public school music educator and administrator for 33 years. He will be retiring this summer and begining a new chapter as Senior Director of Music and Education for the Jazz House Kids in Montclair, NJ,
Team Building for Choral and A Cappella Groups
3:50 – 5:00 ROOM 125
Joe Cantaffa

Joe Cantaffa is a music educator in the Freehold Regional High School District. He is an Entertainment Technology Instructor and Music Teacher in the district’s conservatory-style magnet Performing Arts program (F.P.A.C.) at Howell High School. He has created a niche for his talents in the school district, the community and throughout the United States through several curricular and extra-curricular programs, as well as privately-owned entertainment production projects. Mr. Cantaffa founded the award-winning extra-curricular club 5*Star Records, a student-operated record label, which was later brought to Howell High School and renamed Next2Records. High school students create the many departments of a recording company including songwriting, publishing, marketing, A&R, promotion, legal, accounting, art, advertising and media/public relations. Students compose and produce their own songs, record a professional quality CD, execute a promotional campaign, market and release the product and then track sales through the accounting department. The program currently involves forty-five students, but it reaches the entire student body in the form of focus groups, test markets, and demographic studies. TI:ME, the Technology Institute for Music Educators has recognized this program and is in the presentation stages of developing a grant-funded curriculum, taught by Mr. Cantaffa and Dr. Tom Rudolf, that will assist high school and middle school teachers nation-wide in designing and constructing a student-operated record label in their home schools. Additionally, a website is targeted to launch in January, www.allaccessrecords.com, that will act as a support structure and an online radio station for original music created and released by student record labels and garage bands across America. In 2002, Joe also founded “Rebel Yell,” Howell High School’s honors, mixed, a cappella vocal team. The ensemble develops vocal technique, harmony, professionalism and stage presence through several pop and traditional music idioms. High expectations for these young performers raise the level of intensity during rehearsals and performances. Now five years old, Rebel Yell is approaching its 400th appearance off-campus, is currently mixing it’s first full-length CD and has performed at venues including the PNC Bank Arts Center, Rockefeller Plaza, The Sovereign Bank Arena, Cornell University, the University of Maryland, the University of Delaware, Monmouth University, Rutgers University, the Continental Airlines Arena (The Nets), Giants Stadium, Rutgers Stadium, The Ritacco Center, Boardwalk Hall (Atlantic City), Wall Speedway (NASCAR), Bryant Park (NYC), CNBC’s Morning Show, NJN-TV and on several radio stations.  



Wish It! Grant It! Donors.org
3:50 - 5:00 ROOM 126
Emily Mason

Whether you're in need of basic materials to help your classroom run more smoothly, or you have a dream project that you'd like to make a reality, come to this session to learn how to write a successful DonorsChoose.org project, and tips for getting funding.
Bring your ideas (and a laptop, if you have one), and we can start the process together! Each teacher in attendance who has never written a project before will receive a $5 donation when their first project goes live.
Please note: only public (and charter) school teachers are eligible to write a project on DonorsChoose.org.


​Emily Mason is the entering her 14th year of teaching music, and is currently teaching elementary music in Berlin Township. Prior to that, she taught elementary and middle school general music, choir, and band in Woodbury, NJ, and in New York City Schools. She holds music degrees from the University of Miami and Teachers College, Columbia University.

Emily has had over 80 projects funded and has volunteered for DonorsChoose.org for over ten years. She was recently named a DonorsChoose.org National Teacher Ambassador.


Keep It Moving: Traditional World Dances and Singing Games
3:50 – 5:00 ROOM 226
Rachel Gibson

Come engage in dances and singing games from a variety of world cultures that are suitable for elementary and middle school music classrooms. Enhance your music curriculum with joyous movement activities that promote socialization, responsive movement, and fun!

Dr. Rachel Gibson is an Associate Professor of Music at Westfield State University in Massachusetts and holds a Ph.D. in Music Education from the University of Washington. She is a specialist in early childhood and elementary music education and has trained in Kodály and Orff approaches. She recently completed a seven-month sabbatical in Guatemala and Nicaragua where she engaged in folk song collection and language study. Prior to her current position, Dr. Gibson taught K-6 general and choral music for 15 years in New York, Connecticut, and Washington State. 



Integrating Literature Through Orff Schulwerk Process
3:50 – 5:00 ROOM 222
Ardith Collins

This session will explore possibilities of bringing literature to life through Orff process

Ardith Collins teaches grades 5 - 7 General Music and String Ensemble in Manhattan. Ardith has completed Orff Schulwerk and Kodály Levels, and is an avid folk dancer and rounds enthusiast. Rounds To Sing, Rounds to Play will explore the joy of rounds for all musicians. Teachers of all music areas: instrumental, general, and choral are welcome to attend!


Special Ed Forum
3:50 – 5:00 ROOM 236
Maureen Butler


Stop in and let’s talk. Have questions, concern, ideas about the special learner and music? Want some help with a tough issue? Stop in and talk with the experts. 

Maureen Butler received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Education and Performance at New Jersey City University and her Master of Arts degree in Creative Arts at New York University. She has been teaching music for more than twenty years in the Mountain Lakes District in New Jersey: at the Lake Drive School for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children in Mountain Lakes, where she has designed and implemented a curriculum for students with hearing loss, and at Wildwood Elementary School where she teaches grades K-3 and directs the 5th grade chorus. An NJMEA Board Member, she presents workshops throughout the state and writes about special education topics as they apply to the music classroom for the state journal TEMPO. A former church music director, she currently free-lances on organ and piano in northern New Jersey.





Session Details and Presenter Biographies
Please be sure to join us at 5:00 for our annual Rachel’s Raffle along with our 
Coffee and Dessert Reception